In December 2016, a winter weather event disrupted fleet operations, causing Frontier to delay or cancel up to 70% of their flights during the peak of the crisis, many without any advance notice. On the weekend of December 17, the storm caused major delays at Frontier's Denver hub, and the effects of the storm were felt throughout the fleet.[59] Flights were delayed or canceled at airports across the country, as in some cases, planes were ready to depart, but there were no rested flight crews available to service the flight.[60] The head of Frontier's pilot's union issued a statement criticizing the companies' handling of the event, comparing the airline to a "house of cards".[61] Frontier received over 30,000 refund requests for canceled flights resulting from the event.[citation needed] 

On January 11, 2007, Frontier Airlines signed an 11-year service agreement with Republic Airlines. Under the agreement, Republic was to operate 17, 76-seat Embraer 170 aircraft for the former Frontier JetExpress operations. At the time the contract was canceled in April 2008, Republic Airlines operated 11 aircraft for Frontier Airlines, with the remaining six aircraft expected to join the fleet by December 2008. With the integration of Republic aircraft, the 'JetExpress' denotation was removed. Subsequent to the cessation of Horizon's services for Frontier in December 2007, all flights operated by Republic were sold and marketed as "Frontier Airlines, operated by Republic Airlines." The first market created specifically for the Embraer 170 was Louisville, Kentucky, which began on April 1, 2007. Service to Louisville was suspended in August 2008 but restarted in April 2010.[citation needed]
Today, it serves 77 cities on 176 routes. They cover destinations like Bellingham, Washington, Vancouver, British Columbia, Fort Lauderdale, Las Vegas, Nevada, Los Angeles, California, Myrtle Beach, Orlando, PhoenixMesa, Arizona, San Francisco Bay, Fort Myers and Tampa Bay or St. Petersburg-Clearwater. They have their operation bases at Bellingham International Airport, Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport, Las Vegas McCarran International Airport, Los Angeles International Airport, Oakland International Airport, Orlando-Sanford International Airport, PhoenixMesa Gateway Airport and St. Petersburg-Clearwater International Airport.
In 2007, jetBlue was also facing reliability problems with its Embraer 190 fleet. For a couple of months, jetBlue contracted ExpressJet to operate four Embraer 145 regional jets on behalf of jetBlue. While this was going on two E-190 aircraft at a time were sent to an Embraer maintenance facility in Nashville, Tennessee.[19] ExpressJet operated routes between Boston Logan and Buffalo, New York and Washington Dulles, and between New York–JFK and Columbus, Ohio (has terminated) and Richmond, Virginia.[20]
After making a codeshare agreement with Lufthansa that went into effect in 2010, jetBlue transitioned to the Sabre reservation system used by Lufthansa,[107] enabling the airlines to sell tickets on each other's flights, transfer luggage and passengers between the two carriers, and combine frequent flyer programs,.[108] By making use of JetBlue's North America routes as a feeder network, the agreement put Lufthansa in a position to operate quasi-hubs in New York–JFK and Boston Logan.
Say for example there are two hotels side by side. One meets all the requirements of the Diamond classification, pool, valet etc etc. The other may have vastly better quality rooms, best furnishings, best of everything but does not have a pool. If that was your hotel, even though anyone can clearly see that it's better than the hotel next door, would you feel it's fair it won't meet the Two Diamond standards?
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