In July 2013, Frontier started service from New Castle Airport near Wilmington, Delaware to five destinations,[41] which Frontier markets as Wilmington/Philadelphia. Again, this airport had no commercial service prior to Frontier's entry.[citation needed] New Castle Airport lies roughly 30 miles southwest of Philadelphia International Airport and 75 miles northeast of Baltimore–Washington International Airport.[citation needed]
On July 24, 2007, jetBlue reported that its second-quarter revenue increased to $730 million, compared to $612 in 2006. Second quarter net income grew to $21 million for the quarter, from $14 million the previous year. CEO David Barger said the airline will take delivery of three fewer planes this year and will sell three planes from their current fleet, "slowing capacity growth ... to strengthen our balance sheet and facilitate earnings growth", but will continue to add two to four new destinations each year.[25]
Nevada-based Allegiant (G4) is a low-cost carrier that flies all Economy Class aircraft to about 100 destinations in 40 US states. On many routes, it only operates a couple times a week, and it typically flies to smaller, regional airports. However, Allegiant's focus cities include a mix of smaller and larger airports, including Bellingham International Airport (BLI), Fort Lauderdale–Hollywood International Airport (FLL), Los Angeles International Airport (LAX), Las Vegas's McCarran International Airport (LAS) and Phoenix–Mesa Gateway Airport (AZA).
Frontier Airlines is an American ultra low-cost carrier headquartered in Denver, Colorado. The eighth-largest commercial airline in the US, Frontier Airlines operates flights to over 100 destinations throughout the United States and six international destinations, and employs more than 3,000 air-travel professionals.[15] The carrier is a subsidiary and operating brand of Indigo Partners, LLC, and maintains a hub at Denver International Airport with numerous focus cities across the US. In August 2018, Frontier began connecting passengers with Mexican low-cost carrier Volaris under a codeshare agreement.[16]
On October 25, 2016 JetSuiteX announced that JetBlue had made a minority equity investment in JetSuiteX. Part of the agreement also gave JetBlue a seat on JetSuite's board of directors. Reasons for the investment was outlined by CEO Robin Hayes "Our investment in JetSuite makes sense as we continue to execute on our west coast plan and invest in innovative ideas that reflect the disruptive spirit of JetBlue."[143] In JetBlue's 1st quarter 2018 investor call JetBlue's CFO Steven Priest Confirmed they currently hold about 10% [144] of JetSuiteX.
While its financial performance started showing signs of improvement, in February 2007, jetBlue faced a crisis, when a snowstorm hit the Northeast and Midwest, throwing the airline's operations into chaos. Because jetBlue followed the practice of never cancelling flights, it desisted from calling flights off, even when the ice storm hit and the airline was forced to keep several planes on the ground. Because of this, passengers were kept waiting at the airports for their flights to take off. In some cases, passengers who had already boarded their planes were kept waiting on the apron for several hours and were not allowed to disembark. However, after all this, the airline was eventually forced to cancel most of its flights because of prevailing weather conditions.[17] The fiasco reportedly cost JetBlue $30 million.[18]
Frontier has a three-tier frequent flyer status program. The tiers are Elite 20K (earned by flying 20,000 Status Qualifying Miles [SQM] or 25 segments in a calendar year), Elite 50K (50,000 SQM or 50 segments), and Elite 100K (100,000 SQM or 100 segments). Elite benefits include free carry-on and checked bags, advance seat assignment and family seating, priority boarding, redemption fee waiver, stretch seating, Discount Den membership, and mileage multipliers.[74]

Frequent flyers of jetBlue Airways can benefit from the airline�s loyalty program, TrueBlue. The carrier takes a high-tech approach to their "flight gratitude program," skipping membership cards and paper mailings in favor of online operations. Points earned through jetBlue or its partners do not expire, as long as the member flies with the airline at least once per year. Points are earned for flights booked, with members accumulating three points for every dollar spent on a jetBlue service. The carrier awards double points if members book online.
In May 2015, Indigo and Frontier announced the departure of David Siegel as CEO. He had already previously turned over the role of president to Barry Biffle, formerly of Spirit Airlines. Siegel was not immediately replaced. Instead, his duties were split between Biffle and Indigo chairman Bill Franke. Biffle cited operational issues in connection with Siegel's departure.[50]
Various consumer rights organizations and activists called for the creation of a government mandated “Bill of Rights” to protect air travelers from future experiences similar to the one previously described. On February 20, 2007, jetBlue released an apologetic response to the events that had taken place less than a week before with the creation of their Customer Bill of Rights, which offers financial reciprocation if a customer's flight is delayed or cancelled.[99]
In August 2012, Travelocity faced a viral controversy when it offered a $200 coupon code to attendees at the National Federation of the Blind annual conference in Dallas. After the NFB posted the code on Twitter without mentioning the attendee restriction, Travelocity re-tweeted it without noticing the error but deleted the tweet a day later. After some travel blogs and message boards resposted the code, many ineligible travelers used the code.[30] Travelocity responded by cancelling all trips that used the code who weren't on the list of attendees at the NFB annual conference. This resulted in a barrage of complaints from customers angry to see their trips suddenly cancelled.[31]

On September 9, 2014, Frontier introduced an updated livery,[86] as part of a rebranding that saw the spokesanimals' roles increase. The new livery reintroduced a green "FRONTIER" typeface to the fuselage, featuring the stylized "F" designed by Saul Bass for the original Frontier in 1978. Each aircraft features the name of the animal featured on its tail near the nose of the aircraft for easier identification. Currently about twenty five aircraft in the Frontier fleet feature the new livery.
Frontier Airlines was incorporated on February 8, 1994, by a group that included executives of the original incarnation of Frontier Airlines in response to the void left by Continental Airlines' 1993 shutdown of its Denver (Stapleton) hub.[17] Scheduled flights began five months later in July 1994 using Boeing 737-200 jetliners on routes between Denver and four destinations in North Dakota: Bismarck, Minot, Fargo and Grand Forks. By January 1995, Frontier had expanded its route network from Denver and was serving Albuquerque, New Mexico; Billings, Montana; Bismarck, N.D.; Bozeman, Montana; El Paso, Texas; Fargo, N.D.; Great Falls, Montana; Las Vegas, Nevada; Missoula, Montana; Omaha, Nebraska; and Tucson, Arizona with 737's.[18] Like the original airline of the same name, the new Frontier operated a hub at Denver (DEN) and for the first nine years used the slogan "The Spirit of the West" which was displayed above the windows and just behind the cursive letters "Frontier" on the fuselage of their aircraft. In 1999, Frontier signed agreements to begin purchasing and leasing Airbus A318 and A319 jet aircraft and had also added Boeing 737-300 jetliners to its fleet as well. Also by September 1999, the airline was serving destinations from coast to coast in the U.S., having expanded its route network to include Atlanta (ATL); Baltimore (BWI); Bloomington/Normal, Illinois (BMI); Boston (BOS); Chicago (MDW, Midway Airport); Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW); Phoenix (PHX); Los Angeles (LAX); Minneapolis/St. Paul (MSP); New York City (LGA, LaGuardia Airport); Orlando (MCO); Portland, Oregon (PDX); Salt Lake City (SLC); San Diego (SAN); San Francisco (SFO); and Seattle (SEA), all served from its Denver hub.[19]
Also in 2010, JetBlue entered into interline booking agreements with South African Airways[109] and American Airlines[110] to facilitate luggage transfers between airlines for passengers with connecting flights on a different carrier. The agreement with American included JetBlue's 18 destinations not served by American and American's 12 international flights out of New York–JFK and Boston Logan. In addition, American gave JetBlue 8 round trips slots out of Washington National in D.C. and 2 out of Westchester, New York. In return, JetBlue gave American 6 round trips out of New York–JFK. The agreement with American Airlines has since ended according to JetBlue's website.[111]
As of 2018 it ranked No. 402 financially on the Fortune 500 list of the largest United States corporations by total revenue.[8] JetBlue Airways operates over 1,000 flights daily[9] and serves 102[10] domestic and international network destinations in the U.S., Mexico, the Caribbean, Central America and South America. JetBlue is not a member of any of the three major airline alliances, but it has codeshare agreements with 21 airlines, including member airlines of oneworld, SkyTeam, Star Alliance, and unaffiliated airlines.
Travelocity was created in 1995 through a joint venture between Worldview Systems Corporation and Sabre Holdings. The founding team at Worldview conceived of the idea in 1994 as an extension to their online travel database offering which had been distributed through Sabre, Bloomberg, AOL and many others. The founding team at Worldview joined with distribution partner Sabre in a 50-50 JV that resulted in the development and launch of Travelocity in 1995-1996. The founding members of the Travelocity team, responsible for the conception, development and launch at Worldview were: Steve Baloff (Founder, CEO), Sam Haugh (VP Operations), BD Goel (VP Engineering), Neil Checkoway (VP Marketing), Steve Bengston (VP Business Development), Helen Zia (Editor-in-Chief) and Katherine Chesbrough(CFO). Later in 1996, Worldview's investors (Advanced Publication and Ameritech) sold their stake in Travelocity to a subsidiary of Sabre Holdings and was run by long-time Sabre information technology executive Terry Jones.[4] As one of the pioneers of web-based disintermediation, Travelocity.com was the first website that allowed consumers the ability to reserve, book, and purchase tickets without the help of a travel agent or broker.[4] In addition to airfares, the site also permits consumers to book hotel rooms, rental cars, cruises and packaged vacations.[3]
The airline does not have separate travel cabins, but it offers first class flights at economy class airfares. Passengers have several food options while on-board, including Coca Cola brand beverages, Dunkin� Donuts coffee and tea and chips, Doritos, popcorn and other snacks. Cocktails are available for a small charge. For meals, jetBlue offers low-cost boxed options any time of the day. Enjoy a croissant and fruit cup with breakfast, cheese and crackers with lunch, protein-packed foods, and vegetarian and kosher meals.
In 2008, jetBlue partnered with Irish flagship carrier Aer Lingus to allow passengers to switch between airlines on a single ticket for flights with connections in New York–JFK or Boston Logan. Unlike traditional codeshare agreements, the companies cannot sell seats on each other's flights, so customers initiate the purchase on one airline's website and then are transferred to the other site to complete the transaction.[105][106]
In July 2012, the U.S. Department of Transportation fined Travelocity $180,000 after discovering that Travelocity's “flexible dates tool” did not always include fuel surcharges that were part of many international airfares in violation of the Department's rules requiring all carrier-imposed surcharges and fees to be included in every advertised fare. In addition, the DOT found that the customer was informed only on the final page before purchasing the ticket that some itineraries required a paper ticket with a minimum additional delivery fee of $29.95.[29]
Frontier was ranked in an airline quality rating report by Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and Wichita State University in 2015 as one of the five worst airlines in the United States, especially due to its rate of customer complaints and bumped passengers.[88][51][89] The airline also had relatively poor on-time performance, and the waiting time for help when calling the airline on the phone was reported to have risen to two hours or more.[90]
In July 2013, Frontier started service from New Castle Airport near Wilmington, Delaware to five destinations,[41] which Frontier markets as Wilmington/Philadelphia. Again, this airport had no commercial service prior to Frontier's entry.[citation needed] New Castle Airport lies roughly 30 miles southwest of Philadelphia International Airport and 75 miles northeast of Baltimore–Washington International Airport.[citation needed]
jetBlue expanded service to the Caribbean, including to St. Maarten and Puerto Plata commencing January 10, 2008. With these additional destinations, jetBlue serves a total of twelve Caribbean/Atlantic destinations including Aruba; Barbados; Bermuda; Cancún; Nassau; Aguadilla; Ponce; San Juan, Puerto Rico; Santiago; and Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.[citation needed]
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