Dave Siegel took the chief executive officer role in January 2012.[62] Siegel's tenure ran through May 2015, when he left for personal reasons and was succeeded by the company's chairman, Bill Franke, who would manage strategy and finances.[62] In April 2014, Barry L. Biffle was appointed as the company's president, reporting to Siegel;[63] after Siegel's departure, Biffle was charged with managing the company's day-to-day operations.[62]
After making a codeshare agreement with Lufthansa that went into effect in 2010, jetBlue transitioned to the Sabre reservation system used by Lufthansa,[107] enabling the airlines to sell tickets on each other's flights, transfer luggage and passengers between the two carriers, and combine frequent flyer programs,.[108] By making use of JetBlue's North America routes as a feeder network, the agreement put Lufthansa in a position to operate quasi-hubs in New York–JFK and Boston Logan.
In July 2012, the U.S. Department of Transportation fined Travelocity $180,000 after discovering that Travelocity's “flexible dates tool” did not always include fuel surcharges that were part of many international airfares in violation of the Department's rules requiring all carrier-imposed surcharges and fees to be included in every advertised fare. In addition, the DOT found that the customer was informed only on the final page before purchasing the ticket that some itineraries required a paper ticket with a minimum additional delivery fee of $29.95.[29]
The initial JetExpress partnership with Mesa ended in January 2004, when Horizon Air was selected to operate the routes. Horizon utilized slightly larger CRJ-700 regional jet aircraft on these routes. In August 2006, Frontier and Horizon ended their partnership.[64] While Frontier was generally pleased with Horizon's operation, the carrier decided that it needed to revisit the agreement and find a provider with additional regional jets to grow the operation. The last of the CRJ-700's was returned to the Horizon Air fleet on November 30, 2007.
The airline does not have separate travel cabins, but it offers first class flights at economy class airfares. Passengers have several food options while on-board, including Coca Cola brand beverages, Dunkin� Donuts coffee and tea and chips, Doritos, popcorn and other snacks. Cocktails are available for a small charge. For meals, jetBlue offers low-cost boxed options any time of the day. Enjoy a croissant and fruit cup with breakfast, cheese and crackers with lunch, protein-packed foods, and vegetarian and kosher meals.
jetBlue previously had its headquarters at 80–02 Kew Gardens Road,[80] and then in the Forest Hills Tower, both in Forest Hills, Queens, New York City,[81][80] 6 miles (9.7 km) from the current office in Long Island City.[82] In 2001 the airline had announced that it wanted to take 74,000 square feet (6,900 m2) of space in the Forest Hills Tower, and by December 2002 announced that it planned to increase its leased space.
Air Charter Bahamas Berry Aviation Bighorn Airways Charter Air Transport Choice Airways Contour Aviation Delta Private Jets Eastern Airlines ExcelAire Great Lakes Air Gryphon Airlines IBC Airways JetSuite L-3 Flight International Aviation Miami Air International NetJets Omni Air International Pacific Coast Jet Pentastar Aviation Phoenix Air PlaneSense Presidential Airways Rediske Air Sierra Pacific Airlines Skymax Superior Aviation Swift Air Tailwind Air Service Talkeetna Air Taxi Twin Cities Air Service World Atlantic Airlines XOJET
In July 2017, Frontier announced 21 new cities and 84 new routes. These cities include Buffalo, Charleston, S.C., Pensacola, Jackson Hole, Palm Springs, San Jose, Reno, Little Rock, and Tulsa. Destinations that saw a significant bump-up in new service include Austin, Cincinnati, Long Island/Islip, N.Y., Miami, Orlando, Providence, San Antonio, and Tampa.[68]

Travelocity was created in 1995 through a joint venture between Worldview Systems Corporation and Sabre Holdings. The founding team at Worldview conceived of the idea in 1994 as an extension to their online travel database offering which had been distributed through Sabre, Bloomberg, AOL and many others. The founding team at Worldview joined with distribution partner Sabre in a 50-50 JV that resulted in the development and launch of Travelocity in 1995-1996. The founding members of the Travelocity team, responsible for the conception, development and launch at Worldview were: Steve Baloff (Founder, CEO), Sam Haugh (VP Operations), BD Goel (VP Engineering), Neil Checkoway (VP Marketing), Steve Bengston (VP Business Development), Helen Zia (Editor-in-Chief) and Katherine Chesbrough(CFO). Later in 1996, Worldview's investors (Advanced Publication and Ameritech) sold their stake in Travelocity to a subsidiary of Sabre Holdings and was run by long-time Sabre information technology executive Terry Jones.[4] As one of the pioneers of web-based disintermediation, Travelocity.com was the first website that allowed consumers the ability to reserve, book, and purchase tickets without the help of a travel agent or broker.[4] In addition to airfares, the site also permits consumers to book hotel rooms, rental cars, cruises and packaged vacations.[3]
In 2009, jetBlue announced that it was looking for a new headquarters location, and was considering moving either within the New York City metropolitan area or to the Orlando, Florida area.[83] In April 2009, Helen Marshall, the president of the Borough of Queens, said that the City of New York was trying to keep JetBlue in the city;[84] in January 2010, the CEO of JetBlue, Dave Barger, and Governor of Florida Charlie Crist met in Tallahassee, Florida to discuss a possible move to Orlando.[85] A decision was expected by March 2010,[86] although a move would not happen until 2012, when its lease in the Forest Hills Tower expired.[87] 

In August 2012, Travelocity faced a viral controversy when it offered a $200 coupon code to attendees at the National Federation of the Blind annual conference in Dallas. After the NFB posted the code on Twitter without mentioning the attendee restriction, Travelocity re-tweeted it without noticing the error but deleted the tweet a day later. After some travel blogs and message boards resposted the code, many ineligible travelers used the code.[30] Travelocity responded by cancelling all trips that used the code who weren't on the list of attendees at the NFB annual conference. This resulted in a barrage of complaints from customers angry to see their trips suddenly cancelled.[31]
In July 2013, Frontier started service from New Castle Airport near Wilmington, Delaware to five destinations,[41] which Frontier markets as Wilmington/Philadelphia. Again, this airport had no commercial service prior to Frontier's entry.[citation needed] New Castle Airport lies roughly 30 miles southwest of Philadelphia International Airport and 75 miles northeast of Baltimore–Washington International Airport.[citation needed]
The initial JetExpress partnership with Mesa ended in January 2004, when Horizon Air was selected to operate the routes. Horizon utilized slightly larger CRJ-700 regional jet aircraft on these routes. In August 2006, Frontier and Horizon ended their partnership.[64] While Frontier was generally pleased with Horizon's operation, the carrier decided that it needed to revisit the agreement and find a provider with additional regional jets to grow the operation. The last of the CRJ-700's was returned to the Horizon Air fleet on November 30, 2007.
Air travel is undoubtedly the fastest and the safest way to travel which opens up a market for several companies to become your preferred airlines. In such a scenario, when the passenger is literally spoilt for choice and can easily acquire the best deals easily, it sometimes ironically becomes difficult for one to choose any one airline amongst so many. This is why an airline which can make permanent customers out of first time fliers is the one that can actually survive. One such airline is the Allegiant Air.
As jetBlue gained market share, they found a unique positioning where they competed with other low-cost carriers (e.g. Southwest, and Frontier), as well as major carriers (e.g. American, United, and Delta). Amenities such as their live in-flight television, free and unlimited snack offerings, comfortable legroom, and unique promotions fostered an image of impeccable customer service that rivaled the major airlines, while competitive low fares made them a threat to low-cost no-frills carriers as well.[94] 
×