JetBlue Technology Ventures (JTV) [137] is a wholly owned subsidiary of JetBlue that was established in February 2016.[138] JTV is the venture capital arm of JetBlue that invests in and partners with early-stage startups in the travel, hospitality, and transportation space. Its mission is to improve the end-to-end experience of travelers everywhere. As of November 2018, JTV has invested in 21 startups, including hybrid planes,[139] machine learning algorithms,[140] and ground transportation.[141] Investments range in size from $250,000 to $1 million.[142]

jetBlue also utilizes various forms of advertising media. They use print, online, and television ads as well as advertisements on popular social media sites including Hulu and YouTube. jetBlue emphasizes a secondary slogan, "If you wouldn't take it on the ground, don't take it in the air" poking fun at competitors with hidden fees, little, or no amenities and what jetBlue considers an unacceptable level of customer service.[97]
On June 22, 2009, Frontier Airlines announced that pending bankruptcy court approval, Republic Airways Holdings, the Indianapolis-based parent company of Republic Airlines, would acquire all assets of Frontier Airlines for the amount of $108 million. Thus, Frontier Airlines would become a wholly owned subsidiary of Republic.[26] However, 5 weeks later on July 30, Dallas-based Southwest Airlines announced that it would be making a competing bid of $113.6 million for Frontier with intentions to also operate Frontier as a wholly owned subsidiary, but that it would gradually fold Frontier resources into current Southwest operating assets.[citation needed]
ABX Air Air Cargo Carriers Air Transport International AirNet Express Alaska Central Express Aloha Air Cargo Alpine Air Express Ameriflight Amerijet International Ameristar Jet Charter Asia Pacific Airlines Atlas Air Baron Aviation Services Bemidji Airlines Castle Aviation Corporate Air CSA Air Empire Airlines Everts Air Cargo Express One International FedEx Express Flight Express Freight Runners Express Kalitta Air Kalitta Charters II Lynden Air Cargo Martinaire Merlin Airways Mid-Atlantic Freight Mountain Air Cargo National Airlines Northern Air Cargo Polar Air Cargo Royal Air Freight Ryan Air Services Sky Lease Cargo Southern Air Tepper Aviation Transair UPS Airlines USA Jet Airlines West Air Western Global Airlines Wiggins Airways
In October 2013, jetBlue introduced Mint, a premium cabin service on transcontinental and select Caribbean flights. The service began in 2014, using the Airbus A321-231 aircraft ordered by jetBlue. These planes are outfitted with winglets, as well as with "lie flat" seats, and moveable partitions that can create small suites on the airplane.[56] Called "Mint" by jetBlue, these planes are configured with 16 business-class seats and 143 economy seats, instead of an all-economy configuration of 190 seats.[57]
During the last few days of June and the first few days of July 2015, jetBlue began charging for bags in certain booking classes, leaving Southwest Airlines the only major U.S. carrier to not charge for bags. For the classes in which bag check fees are charged (generally the lowest class of fares offered; jetBlue offers 3 classes of fares), the cost is $20 for the first bag and $35 for the second, which is the lowest in the United States besides Frontier Airlines with similar prices.[62]
Denver to Las Vegas Detroit to Denver Chicago to Denver Seattle to Denver Denver to New York Denver to Chicago Atlanta to Denver Dallas to Denver Denver to Phoenix Denver to Los Angeles Houston to Denver Denver to Orlando New York to Denver Denver to Atlanta Phoenix to Denver Denver to San Diego Orlando to Denver Tampa to Denver Denver to San Francisco Denver to Seattle
September 21, 2005: Flight 292 en route from Burbank, California, to New York City performed an emergency landing at Los Angeles International Airport (pictured on the right) following a failure of the front landing gear during retraction when it turned 90 degrees. The plane landed after holding for about three hours to burn fuel and therefore lighten the aircraft. The aircraft came to a stop without incident on runway 25L, the second-longest runway at LAX. The only apparent damage to the plane upon landing was the destruction of the front wheels, which were ground down to almost semicircles, and the tires; the front landing strut held. The passengers were unable to see themselves landing despite the DirecTV service in each seat, as they were instructed to brace.[147]
In February 2002, the airline launched its first regional product, Frontier JetExpress, initially operated by Mesa Airlines using CRJ-200 regional jets. Similar to "express" operations of other carriers, Frontier JetExpress was targeted for markets to and from Denver that do not generate traffic sufficient to support Frontier's smallest mainline jet, the Airbus A318, but could still offer lucrative business with a smaller jet.
On August 4, 2008, the Associated Press reported that jetBlue would replace their recycled pillows and blankets with an "eco-friendly" pillow and blanket package that passengers would have to purchase for use. Each package will cost $7 and will include a $5 coupon from retailer Bed, Bath and Beyond. This decision is the latest in a series of moves designed to increase revenue. jetBlue told the Associated Press that it expects to collect $40 million from passengers selecting seats with extra legroom and $20 million from passengers paying $15 to check a second bag. As of September 8, 2008 JetBlue charges passengers $10–30 for an extended-leg-room seat depending on the length of the flight.[37]
Chautauqua Airlines operated up to 12 Embraer 135 and 145 jets out of Milwaukee. Frontier began branding these flights as Frontier Express in the spring of 2011. With the pull-down of the Milwaukee hub, the only route that continued to operate with a Frontier Express ERJ-145 jet was Milwaukee to Rhinelander. However, Frontier service to Rhinelander ended on January 3, 2013, and Chautauqua transferred the remaining aircraft to other partners.

The TWA Hotel is the TWA Flight Center structure currently being rebuilt as 505-room hotel, preserving the Eero Saarinen headhouse while replacing the structures on either side of the headhouse. Situated in front of JetBlue's JFK terminal, JetBlue has stated that it estimates the ownership of the hotel would be between 5–10% of the final total investment.[138] The hotel will be an effective replacement for the Ramada Plaza JFK Hotel on the north end of the airport grounds in Building 144, which closed in 2009.
Also in 2010, JetBlue entered into interline booking agreements with South African Airways[109] and American Airlines[110] to facilitate luggage transfers between airlines for passengers with connecting flights on a different carrier. The agreement with American included JetBlue's 18 destinations not served by American and American's 12 international flights out of New York–JFK and Boston Logan. In addition, American gave JetBlue 8 round trips slots out of Washington National in D.C. and 2 out of Westchester, New York. In return, JetBlue gave American 6 round trips out of New York–JFK. The agreement with American Airlines has since ended according to JetBlue's website.[111]
JetBlue Technology Ventures (JTV) [137] is a wholly owned subsidiary of JetBlue that was established in February 2016.[138] JTV is the venture capital arm of JetBlue that invests in and partners with early-stage startups in the travel, hospitality, and transportation space. Its mission is to improve the end-to-end experience of travelers everywhere. As of November 2018, JTV has invested in 21 startups, including hybrid planes,[139] machine learning algorithms,[140] and ground transportation.[141] Investments range in size from $250,000 to $1 million.[142]
For many years, analysts had predicted that jetBlue's growth rate would become unsustainable. Despite this, the airline continued to add planes and routes to the fleet at a brisk pace. In addition in 2006, the IAM (International Association of Machinists) attempted to unionize JetBlue's "ramp service workers", in a move that was described by JetBlue's COO Dave Barger as "pretty hypocritical", as the IAM opposed jetBlue's creation when it was founded as New Air in 1998. The union organizing petition was dismissed by the National Mediation Board because fewer than 35 percent of eligible employees supported an election.[citation needed]
^ Jump up to: a b c "JetBlue 2017 Annual Report" (PDF). p. 8. Retrieved 2018-09-19. We are a predominately point-to-point system carrier, with the majority of our routes touching at least one of our six Focus Cities: New York, Boston, Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood, Orlando, Long Beach and San Juan, Puerto Rico. During 2017, over 92% of our Customers flew on nonstop itineraries.
On October 25, 2016 JetSuiteX announced that JetBlue had made a minority equity investment in JetSuiteX. Part of the agreement also gave JetBlue a seat on JetSuite's board of directors. Reasons for the investment was outlined by CEO Robin Hayes "Our investment in JetSuite makes sense as we continue to execute on our west coast plan and invest in innovative ideas that reflect the disruptive spirit of JetBlue."[143] In JetBlue's 1st quarter 2018 investor call JetBlue's CFO Steven Priest Confirmed they currently hold about 10% [144] of JetSuiteX.
In February 2015, Frontier announced that they will begin service to several destinations from Atlanta adding the airport as a focus city. In July, Frontier also began decreasing service from Washington Dulles International Airport removing the airport as a focus city. In early 2016 Frontier announced major route expansion from airports nationwide including Atlanta, Chicago, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Orlando, and Philadelphia.[55] In June 2016, Frontier re-established service to Port Columbus International Airport.[56] In May 2017, the airline announced opening a new crew base in Las Vegas in the fall 2017 to improve operational reliability and potentially create new jobs in Las Vegas.[57] In December 2017, Frontier began service to Buffalo, New York, with service to Denver, Colorado, and Florida, including Miami, Fort Myers, Orlando, and Tampa.[58]
Frontier has a three-tier frequent flyer status program. The tiers are Elite 20K (earned by flying 20,000 Status Qualifying Miles [SQM] or 25 segments in a calendar year), Elite 50K (50,000 SQM or 50 segments), and Elite 100K (100,000 SQM or 100 segments). Elite benefits include free carry-on and checked bags, advance seat assignment and family seating, priority boarding, redemption fee waiver, stretch seating, Discount Den membership, and mileage multipliers.[74]
Today, it serves 77 cities on 176 routes. They cover destinations like Bellingham, Washington, Vancouver, British Columbia, Fort Lauderdale, Las Vegas, Nevada, Los Angeles, California, Myrtle Beach, Orlando, PhoenixMesa, Arizona, San Francisco Bay, Fort Myers and Tampa Bay or St. Petersburg-Clearwater. They have their operation bases at Bellingham International Airport, Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport, Las Vegas McCarran International Airport, Los Angeles International Airport, Oakland International Airport, Orlando-Sanford International Airport, PhoenixMesa Gateway Airport and St. Petersburg-Clearwater International Airport.
Dave Siegel took the chief executive officer role in January 2012.[62] Siegel's tenure ran through May 2015, when he left for personal reasons and was succeeded by the company's chairman, Bill Franke, who would manage strategy and finances.[62] In April 2014, Barry L. Biffle was appointed as the company's president, reporting to Siegel;[63] after Siegel's departure, Biffle was charged with managing the company's day-to-day operations.[62]
Animal concepts used in the livery extend into Frontier's marketing as well. Each animal has a specific name.[87] Animal aircraft used in their radio and television commercials include Jack the rabbit, Grizwald the bear, Foxy the fox (for whom Jack has a crush), Flip the dolphin (who always gets stuck going to Chicago rather than the warmer climates the others are going to), Larry the lynx, Hector the sea otter, and Sal the cougar. New additions are Penguins Jim, Joe, Jay, and Gary, a barbershop-style quartet, singing the praises of EarlyReturns to an audience of Frontier's well-known characters from the "a whole different animal" campaign, Hector the otter, advertising Frontier's expanding service to Mexico, and Polly the Parrot, who won the new animal audition in 2012.
Frontier took delivery of its first Airbus aircraft (an A319) in 2001 and simultaneously launched with it DirecTV in-flight television along with a new company livery. Frontier Airlines was the launch customer[20] of the Airbus A318 in 2003. In mid-April 2005, Frontier officially became an all-Airbus fleet, retiring its last Boeing 737.[citation needed] 

Frontier Miles is the frequent-flyer program for Frontier Airlines, replacing the EarlyReturns program, which existed from 2003 to 2018.[70] Frontier Miles can be earned by flying Frontier Airlines, using the Frontier Airlines World MasterCard, or by spending at partner hotels, car rental chains, cruises, and merchants.[71] Frontier Miles can be redeemed for flights, magazine subscriptions, and car rentals.[72] Since February 2019, hotel stays are also part of the redemption options.[73]
^ Jump up to: a b c "JetBlue 2017 Annual Report" (PDF). p. 8. Retrieved 2018-09-19. We are a predominately point-to-point system carrier, with the majority of our routes touching at least one of our six Focus Cities: New York, Boston, Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood, Orlando, Long Beach and San Juan, Puerto Rico. During 2017, over 92% of our Customers flew on nonstop itineraries.
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